Boulder to Denver Record Attempt

The Denver Post
Activists moonwalking for renewable energy
October 28, 2002

Section: CITY DESK
Page: B-01
Marcos Mocine-McQueen Denver Post Staff Writer
Could it be that in addition to attaining the mantle of king of pop, Michael Jackson also perfected a powerful tool to protect the environment?

That's what three young men are hoping as they try to moonwalk their way into the Guinness Book of World Records.


Adam Hall, 25, Ramsey Brookhart, 26, and Joshua Dodd, 24, are trying to establish a new category in the world-record book - longest moonwalk relay - by gliding about 25 miles along back roads and railroad tracks from Boulder to the state Capitol in downtown Denver.


Why? To raise awareness of and money for renewable energy.


"We live under this brown cloud, and people don't seem to understand how much of that comes from burning coal to produce electricity," Hall said. "We want people to know that there are other ways to make electricity."


Hall, Brookhart and Dodd were among the millions of Jackson fans who in 1983 were awed when he seemed to magically glide backward across the stage without lifting his feet during a TV performance of "Billie Jean."


"We grew up in the '80s, so of course we were Michael Jackson fans," Hall said. "I've been moonwalking since then. I even took lessons when I was a kid."


Brookhart and Hall came up with the idea while driving from Denver to Boulder in 1999. The two met while attending the University of Colorado at Boulder. Hall now sells renewable energy for Choice Energy, and Brookhart and Dodd sell ski trips for Moguls.


So that the three can keep their day jobs, their moonwalking has been by moonlight. They said they didn't train for the record try and are hoping to entertain people.


"It's so ludicrous that people have to notice," Brookhart said Sunday night as he watched to make sure Dodd did not moonwalk into any telephone poles.


They carry only a backpack filled with soda and T-shirts they are selling to raise money.


The trip started Oct. 21, and they hope to moonwalk into the Capitol today. While they aren't likely to be greeted by thousands of screaming women, they are hoping to turn some heads.


Clad in T-shirts emblazoned with a pair of checkered van-style shoes, a tribute to the fashion of the early '80s, they will get a tour of the Capitol and give staff members from the governor's office moonwalking lessons.


Endurance moonwalking apparently is not for the weak of heart. As the trio's website (www.moonwalkforearth.com) explains, "Moonwalking is not a joke. It is extremely demanding both physically and mentally." The site even has an "injury report" section.


"My calves are killing me," Hall said.


If all goes as planned, this moonwalk will be just one small step for the trio. A moonwalk across San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge is in the works, and they hope to moonwalk all the way to Washington, D.C., to gain the attention of national legislators.


They hope their moves will impress 99-year-old U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C. "We'd like to teach him and other lawmakers how to moonwalk," Hall said.


Hall and Brookhart are also hoping to raise money to develop a presentation for high school and college students. They are working on a "moonwalk-umentary," a video about their "cosmic dance for renewable energy."


They are inviting the public to join them at the Capitol at noon.

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